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  • The Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities (DPU) in a June 21 order directed National Grid, Unitil and Eversource Energy to shorten their proposed evaluation and contract negotiation periods for offshore wind bids.

  • POWER-GEN Europe today marked its 25 anniversary by opening a new chapter in the history of European energy industry trade shows. Today the show’s owner, PennWell Corporation, unveiled Electrify Europe, the world’s first event dedicated to the convergence in the power generation and transmission and distribution sectors.

  • The green-bond market has boomed on the allure of investments that help the environment. Now, the industry is trying to show that the reality matches these ambitions. Advisers and rating companies are starting to track the environmental effect of projects funded by green bonds, such as the impact on air pollution.

  • The chief executive officer of Vestas Wind Systems A/S says the world’s biggest wind turbine maker wants to expand in the Middle East and the Asia Pacific region as it taps into growing demand for renewable energy in new markets.

  • The U.S. Conference of Mayors in Miami yesterday approved a resolution calling for 100 percent renewable energy in cities across the U.S. by 2035.

  • In April, solar reached a new milestone, providing more than 2.3 percent of U.S. electrical supply, according to the latest issue of the U.S. Energy Information's (EIA) Electric Power Monthly, with data through April 30, 2017. Consequently, solar has now moved into third place among renewable sources — behind hydropower and wind but ahead of biomass and geothermal.

  • Today, DTU inaugurates a laboratory where researchers will complete a modular robot for use in e.g. offshore wind turbine platforms. The robot will be used for inspection, and the long-term vision is that it will be able to carry out underwater repairs on foundations and rigs.

  • With the confluence of positive factors described in Part 1 of this article, why has the pace of adoption of renewables not been more rapid Indeed, there has been progress, but it has been slow and uneven, depending on the island. There are several reasons for this.

  • The Caribbean depends on imported oil for approximately 90 percent of its energy needs; the exception is Trinidad and Tobago, which has its own source of oil and natural gas. Although the world currently is benefitting from a relatively low cost of oil, 

  • Apple Inc., which issued the biggest green bond ever sold by a U.S. corporation last year to finance projects fighting global warming, is doing it again.

  • For wind turbine operators, focusing on lubrication can have a big impact on enhancing safety. How, you ask?

  • Companies with product offerings that will drive the future of energy services were among the 30 start-ups and scale-ups featured on the World Economic Forum’s 2017 Technology Pioneers list released this week.

  • The Dutch-German transmission operator TenneT now has control of the new 916-MW DolWin2 offshore wind link in the North Sea. ABB yesterday said that it commissioned DolWin2 and handed it over to TenneT.

  • The environment ministers of the world’s seven most powerful industrialized economies met in Bologna this week. This was the first G7 gathering since U.S. President Donald Trump announced his plan to pull out of the Paris Agreement. 

  • Renewables will account for almost three quarters of global investment in power generation between now and 2040, according to a new report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

  • Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Europe’s most valuable oil company, expects its expertise in managing risk will make it a market leader in developing the clean energy industry.

  • The lights of the high-end boutiques and bars of Tokyo’s Ginza neighborhood may someday be powered by wind farms or coal burned more than 1,700 miles away (2,700 kilometers) in Mongolia, electricity zipping over ultra-high voltage lines across deserts and under seas.

  • The U.K.’s search for 100 billion pounds (US$127 billion) to maintain electricity supplies is likely to become tougher after the Conservative government lost its parliamentary majority in an election last week.

  • A collaborative initiative from London-based Carbon Trust will bring together a group of energy companies to investigate use cases for energy storage that will help cut costs associated with integrating wind energy into the UK power grid.

  • A letter signed today by five renewable energy associations urges Congress to oppose the $1.7 billion cut to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) FY18 budget proposed by the Trump Administration.

  • Will 2015 be the high-water mark for annual global wind installations? We recently compiled our data for 2016 in our annual World Wind Energy Market Update 2017 report, finding that—while an enormous amount of wind turbine capacity was installed (over 54.3 GW), this was a 14 percent annual decrease from the over 63.1 GW installed the year before.

  • MHI Vestas Offshore Wind A/S unveiled the world’s most powerful turbine, a 9.5-MW machine that dwarfs the giant London Eye Ferris wheel.

  • In a first for U.S. states, Hawaii Gov. David Ige last week signed two bills that codify commitments and goals of the Paris Agreement.

  • A five-year trial on Scotland’s Shetland Islands has shown that a system of demand-side management, large-scale energy storage and monitoring and control systems — together called active network management (ANM) — has allowed the addition of about 8.5 MW of renewables to the islands’ grid.

  • In the two months since the last update, most of the stocks in my Ten Clean Energy Stocks model portfolio have reported first quarter earnings. There were few surprises, and those were mostly pleasant ones, allowing the model portfolio to add to its gains, and pull a little farther ahead of its benchmark.

  • Jenn Runyon, Chief Editor of Renewable Energy World and Paula Mints, Chief Market Research Analyst with SPV Market Research discuss three hot topics in the global solar industry for three minutes each.

  • I’ve been thinking a lot about innovation this month. I wrote about how wind construction companies are innovating to lower costs in our cover story and talked about that in my video above. But I’m also thinking about BIG innovation — the world-changing kind. In April, I attended the Powering Progress Together (PPT) forum, hosted by Shell and the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). Visionaries from both organizations presented their views of the future of energy. Cho Khong, Chief Political Analyst for Shell, described two views of the future: one shows gas as the primary energy source with wind and solar also supplying large shares of energy while another shows solar power is the primary energy source by the 2030s. Amory Lovins, Chief Scientist with RMI sees only an all-renewable future, dominated by distributed solar and wind. Each visionary began his presentation with photos taken in the early 1900s. In only 13 years, the Easter Parade in New York City went from one filled with horses and buggies to one in which there were no horses of any kind. That means that those buggy manufacturers had only a short time to abandon their business as usual scenarios, retool and become automakers. If they waited too long, they were beat but if they jumped in too early, the market may not have been ready for them. As Lovins stated, the pioneers have the arrows in their backs, the settlers get the land. It may be time for major fossil fuel companies to start ensuring their companies are ready for a future with wind and solar as a primary energy source and EVs dominating the transportation sector. If they are not already doing that, it may be too late.  

  • The theory of the tragedy of the commons holds that those driven solely by self-interest will act to the detriment of the common good. One simple illustration is the depletion of fisheries by unregulated overfishing. Our industrial history also demonstrates the principle. Capitalism’s quest for maximized profit made industry race to the bottom, seeking places that allowed production at its lowest immediate cost. Now, those economies that prospered from that race are recovering from its impacts. The opportunity in the commons is global recognition of the competitive advantage in efficiency. 

  • The governments of Germany, Denmark and Belgium backed a pledge to install 60 GW of new offshore wind power next decade, more than fivefold existing capacity. Energy ministers from the three countries joined chief executives from 25 companies including Dong Energy A/S, the world’s biggest offshore wind developer, to issue a statement pledging to work together to increase investment and reduce costs.

  • General Electric Co. said it’s ready to ship a 1.5 billion euro ($1.7 billion) offshore wind platform destined for the North Sea, underscoring the industrial giant’s commitment to clean power.